News    Calendar    Map    Visiting & About    Home Search
formatting

Deborah Schwartzkopf

formatting
CV/Docs     All Deborah Schwartzkopf    
Deborah  Schwartzkopf

I find it rewarding and challenging to make pots people will use. In my home growing up, hand made objects held special value. They were gestures of consideration and love. I continue to find objects a dwelling place for intention and association. The parameter of function both limits and frees me. It gives me direction and attaches me to community. Eating with family and friends instills a sense of place and relation. At the table I assess finished work and connect studio practice to living. This starts the cycle of making again. I want my pots to live in the kitchen where economy and celebration infuse life with purposeful beauty.

Featured Piece

Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Vase - Crimson Laurel Gallery

Vase
Ceramic - Porcelain
6 x 9 x 7 in
SOLD
formatting

formatting
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Vase - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Vase
Ceramic   Porcelain  
6 x 9 x 7 in
SOLD
DSC01
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Large Oval Serving Bowl - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Large Oval Serving Bowl
Ceramic   Porcelain  
2.5 x 14.5 x 8.5 in
$ 230
DSC06
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Plate - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Large Plate
Ceramic   Porcelain  
1.5 x 11 x 11 in
$ 80
DSC12
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Mug
Mug
Ceramic    
$ 70
DSC005
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Bowl - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Bowl
Ceramic   Porcelain  
2.5 x 6 x 6 in
SOLD
DSC10
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Bowl - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Bowl
Ceramic   Porcelain  
3 x 6 x 6 in
SOLD
DSC11
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Cup
Cup
Ceramic   Porcelain  
1.5 x 3 x 3 in
SOLD
DSC18
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Cup - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Cup
Ceramic   Porcelain  
4 x 3 x 3 in
SOLD
DSC16
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Cup - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Cup
Ceramic   Porcelain  
3 3/8 x 3 3/8 x 3 3/8 in
SOLD
DSC17
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Plate - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Large Plate
Ceramic   Porcelain  
1.5 x 11 x 11 in
SOLD
DSC13
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Liquor Bottle - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Liquor Bottle
Ceramic   Porcelain  
8 x 6.5 x 4 in
SOLD
DSC02
 
Deborah  Schwartzkopf Deborah Schwartzkopf  - Medium Oval Serving Bowl - Crimson Laurel Gallery
Medium Oval Serving Bowl
Ceramic   Porcelain  
2.5 x 10 x 6 in
SOLD
DSC07
 
 NEXT >

formatting

 

Deborah  Schwartzkopf

Deborah Schwartzkopf

Deborah Schwartzkopf Biography

Deb Schwartzkopf was born and raised in Seattle, Washington.  From 1999-2002 she earned her BA at the University of Alaska and worked for professional studio potters in the Anchorage area. The combination of learning at a university and as a studio assistant made for a well rounded education. She did a one year independent study at San Diego State University.  It was here that she began to develop her own glaze palette in earnst. Schwartzkopf was an artist-in-residence at the Archie Bray Foundation from 2005-2007, after receiving her MFA from Penn State. Since then she has taught as a visiting professor at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, Massachusetts College of Art and Design in Boston, and the University of Washington in Seattle and with the University of Georgia in their Study Abroad progam in Cortona, Italy. In addition, she has exhibited and taught numerous workshops nationally and internationally. She has also been a resident artist at the Center for Ceramics in Berlin Germany, Mudflat Studios in Somerville, MA, and The Clay Studio in Philadelphia,PA. In 2010 Deb returned to Seattle and made work and taught at  Pottery Northwest for two years. Deb also teaches workshops and exhibits nationally and internationally. She and her partner, George Rodriguez, bought a house in the Seattle area.  They funded their kiln yard with a kickstarter campaign- IGNITE: An Essential Kiln Yard! Check out the link to view images of the building in progress!
They are thrilled to be establishing their studio in the area!

Deborah Schwartzkopf Description

Deborah Schwartzkopf is a full time studio potter working in Seattle, WA. She has developed a distinct approach to building her complex forms blending wheel thrown and hand built sections. Her pots marry the clean lines of modern architecture and the asymmetry of the natural world.

CLAY
Specifics: I use Mac 6 made by Clay Art in Tacoma, Washington. This is a cone-six porcelain that works well for wheel throwing and hand building! It has a good firing range and I have not had trouble with slumping or warping. They are an amazing company to work with! Visit their website at http://www.clayartcenter.net

I use porcelain for its luminosity. It glows through the transparent liner glazes and adds a soft brilliance to the matt glazes. Where the clay breaks on edges is shows through and lightens the overall palette of my work.

SURFACES
Specifics: I make all my own glazes. I also use AMACO Velvet under-glazes for the contrasting speckles. This under-glaze is applied with a small applicator bottle or with an airbrush to bisque-ware fired to Cone 06. Layers of glaze are then applied over this under-glaze.

I take these steps when I glaze...
Group pieces into different glaze combination options
Sign bottoms with under-glaze pencil and dots of underglaze
Paint glaze on bottoms, sponge off, sponge foot to make clean line
Pour liner glaze in the inside, pour out extra, sponge away drips
Wax interiors and bottoms
Paint small bright swatches of color
Wax over bright swatches
Apply underglaze to bisque ware. Dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, dot, all day
Then if the piece fits easily in a 5 gal. bucket it gets a first outer surface dipped glaze layer
Often there is a second layer glaze dip
Usually two glazes are sprayed after this dipping. Sometimes three.
Everything is sponged- inside, swatches, and foot.
Then the kiln is loaded.

FIRING
Specifics: I fire with a glorified toaster oven : ) Which by brand is a large electric kiln made by Skutt. It feels so simple to press start after learning to fire a wood kiln or gas salt-kiln (which I did for most of my time potting).

I recently switched to cone six electric from cone ten gas-oxidation. Previous to that I was firing cone 10, salt, gas-oxidation. Now I get variation, I previously received from the kiln atmosphere, through layering and spraying glazes.

I find that in having my own studio this is more cost effective, easier to hook up in a city and it also allows me to work through ideas fast, as it does not take as long to fill the electric kiln as it did the big gas kiln. I also feel that now that I can fire successfully in the electric my options open in terms of traveling and working in other studios. Most studios have an electric kiln…

tilitarian forms, challenging us to pay closer attention to the moments and objects that accent our day-to-day. Each piece is thoughtfully made by hand.  Serve your food beautifully!

All of Deborah’s work is made from porcelain and is fired in an electric kiln to cone six (This is around 2200F).

Deborah Schwartzkopf Statement

I find it rewarding and challenging to make pots people will use. In my home growing up, hand made objects held special value. They were gestures of consideration and love. I continue to find objects a dwelling place for intention and association. The parameter of function both limits and frees me. It gives me direction and attaches me to community. Eating with family and friends instills a sense of place and relation. At the table I assess finished work and connect studio practice to living. This starts the cycle of making again. I want my pots to live in the kitchen where economy and celebration infuse life with purposeful beauty.

The processes I use yield complex forms defined by animated lines and soft planes. Multiple parts are pieced together. At times I combine wheel thrown and hand built parts. At others a singular method is used. The slab parts are patterned and laid over bisqued clay molds. I build these molds with reclaimed clay and shape them with the wheel or by coiling building. I find they give me the ability to make slab pieces with consistent volume. When I first approached hand building I had complicated patterns for every shape. Over time I have simplified patterns. With practice the process has become nimble and intuitive. This is freeing to me. Simple patterns are easier to augment and develop into new forms. I find refinement like a glacier moving down a valley: troublesome areas are meditatively eroded away and new ideas spring to mind. Slow practice yields fluidity in process, allowing me to shift focus to formal elements, intentional references, and how a pot will feel or fit into life.

Pots are a place where I embrace abstraction of emotions and communication in form. Birds are starting places in my study of stance and expression. I want to capture their expressions of precision and breath. The awkward pelican and elegant, buoyant loon embody curious shapes I mesh with geometric, sensual, and architectural elements. On the surfaces of my work, I merge our culture’s signals and nature’s placement of hue. Even in the Seattle winter, humming birds flash and scoot for nectar from my rosemary bush. Traffic lights illuminate the night, demanding attention as I bike through the city. With intentional placement, these visual messages imply function, trigger associations, and call for exploration. I find the relationship between form and surface integral and defining. Each informs the other within my cyclic studio practice.

The reciprocal relationship between my work and my life is unfolding; my chosen pathway in clay directs my life. As I strive for balance, the lessons I transfer from biking or gardening enrich my studio practice. Time with family and friends feed my inner life. I am gathering and truing my ideas, process, and dreams.

Top of Page

 

formatting